Week 16- #2. Below The Knees 12/15-12/21/2014

While on a walk along the waterway just south of Sea World and realized there was a world of activity going on below me in the riverbed. Here are a few pictures of a squirrel, and several types of birds including ducks & California Least Tern._DSC0093 _DSC0099 _DSC0101 _DSC0103 _DSC0109 _DSC0117 _DSC0122 _DSC0131 _DSC0134 _DSC0136 _DSC0137 _DSC0138 _DSC0143 _DSC0150 _DSC0152 _DSC0156 _DSC0161

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By xrayfrog

week 15-#A2. Circle(s) 12/8-12/14/2014

I took a trip to Balboa park and decided I wanted to get some pictures of the main bridge coming into the park, in my adventure of trying to get a good picture of the bridge I found many different circles. So here is a collection of circles I found along the way.

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Metal cap to a pipe in the park, just northwest of the main area of Balboa Park known as the Prado

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not a regular circle, but I found this cut log to be pretty close

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Drainage pipe looking straight down

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The same drainage pipe, only looking at it from an angle

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here we have a cap to what I figured was part of the irrigation system

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If you aren’t sure what this is, no worries it took me a moment as well. This is one of those glo-necklaces that someone felt the need to discard in a tree in the park. Obviously not something that belongs there but a circle none the less so of course I took a picture of it.

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These above 2 pictures are of the holes used to place the American Flag Poles whenever there is a holiday and they want to line the sides of the bridge sidewalks leading into Balboa Park.

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I almost missed these circles on the ground, this is the covering of a drainage area in the sidewalk between the Museum of Man and a neighboring museum

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I came across some open man-holes as they were doing some work on the bridge.

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While looking into the hole I found yet another circle in the form of a bucket opening

By xrayfrog

Week 14-#42. Skyline Panorama 12/1-12/7/2014

looking towards Coronado at the bridge and the Hotel Del Coronado

looking towards Coronado at the bridge and the Hotel Del Coronado

_DSC0034 these photos were all taken while standing at the Cabrillo Monument at Pt Loma looking back across the bay toward San Diego city and beyond

Looking towards the downtown area of San Diego with the military base runway area in the foreground

Looking towards the downtown area of San Diego with the military base runway area in the foreground

Looking south towards Southern San Diego County and Mexico

Looking south towards Southern San Diego County and Mexico

panning across

panning across

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Week 13-#15. Graveyard 11/24-11/30/2014

Another set of pictures from the Tennessee trip included a trip to the ON CAMPUS Graveyard at Maryville College. I could not find any written info on it, however from talking to a former student it apprears in is filled with prominent staff and administrators from the college over the years._DSC0294 _DSC0295 _DSC0296 _DSC0297 _DSC0298 _DSC0299 _DSC0300 _DSC0301 _DSC0302 _DSC0303

By xrayfrog

WEEK 12-#12. Fences And Or Rails 11/17-11/23/2014

While visiting East Tennessee for my fiance college reunion,  in October, we took a trip through parts of the Great Smokey Mountains. Here are a few pictures of Fences or Rails I saw along the way some are original to the area from when people actually lived in the area in the late 1800’s and some are much newer but each is unique in it’s own way.

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one of the original homesteads in the area

one of the original homesteads in the area

Close up of the fencing, notice there are no posts just lumber stacked on each other in a zig-zag pattern

Close up of the fencing, notice there are no posts just lumber stacked on each other in a zig-zag pattern

close up for detail

close up for detail

Looking straight down on the post

Looking straight down on the post

Fence made of wood and wire

Fence made of wood and wire

another homestead down the road

another homestead down the road

detail of the use of wire between posts a small hand carved wooded piece that was used to twist the wire to the proper tension

detail of the use of wire between posts a small hand carved wooded piece that was used to twist the wire to the proper tension

closer look at the fence

closer look at the fence

Lastly a rail coming along the bridge from the stone mill to the main property, again circa late 1800's

Lastly a rail coming along the bridge from the stone mill to the main property, again circa late 1800’s

By xrayfrog

Week 11- #17. High Above 11/10-11/16/2014

As I stated in my prior weeks post I went out looking to take pictures of some planes taking off or coming into the San Diego International airport. So for this weeks posting of High Above, I thought I would shoot looking upward, out over the horizon. These were taken while standing across the bay from the end of the runway.

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Coming into San Diego

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Taking off

Taking off

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By xrayfrog

Week 10# A5. Reflections 11/3-11/9/2014

At the beginning of November I was up early to go to a continuing education event near downtown San Diego. I had arrived earlier than I needed to be and decided to drive around and explore, as I have been here once or twice before for other events but was always on a time constraint. And seeing as how this area was once the Naval training center before the government closed down many bases across the country. It has been transformed into a community within a community in the Pt Loma area. While walking around on a previous visit I had noticed that the airport runway was just across the inlet of water from the bay. I thought I would head over to that side of the former base and see if I could capture pictures of planes taking off and landing. Here are a couple of pictures I was able to capture.

Sunrise reflections

Sunrise reflections

Morning Flight

Morning Flight

Looking the other way across the bay

Looking the other way across the bay

By xrayfrog

Week 9 # 45- Statutes/Statues 10/27-11/2/2014

 I came across this statue outside the Life guard tower in Ocean Beach and wanted to find out if it was just art or if there was more to this bronze guy looking out upon the beach. Little did I know what I would find, or the history of the area. The following is what I found out….

Colorado artist Richard Arnold said he envisioned the piece to honor members of the San Diego Lifeguard Service who watched over him and passed along advice and wisdom while he was growing up in Ocean Beach in the 1950s.

Along the way, the project evolved into an installation of not only the statue but also a large bronze plaque recalling a tragedy off the coast 95 years ago that gave birth to San Diego’s modern lifeguard service.

On May 5, 1918, 13 men — including 11 soldiers and sailors — drowned in strong rip currents off Ocean Beach. Another 60 lives were saved in heroic rescue efforts. Four police lifeguards were aided by other swimmers to drag survivors and three of the bodies ashore.

The memorial plaque, fastened to a large concrete block a few yards from the statue, was unveiled in a 90-minute ceremony next to a lifeguard tower near the foot of Santa Monica Avenue and Abbott Street. There was music, prayers and speeches, and 13 lifeguards tossed leis into the ocean in memory of the 1918 victims.

Standing Watch

Standing Watch

At the dedication ceremony, Lifeguard Chief Rick Wurts said the mass, single-day drownings in 1918 served as a “call to action” for the city to fund a larger, better-equipped lifeguard service. Today, he said, the 95 full-time and 200 part-time lifeguards typically make 4,000 to 6,000 ocean rescues each year.

In further memory of the 1918 drowning victims, 13 Torrey pine seedlings are to be planted at Sunset Cliffs Natural Park south of Ladera Street.

I now have a new appreciation for a landmark I took for granted and never gave it any further thought until this blog was started. Time to get out there and see what other treasures I can find. Nite all.

By xrayfrog

Week 8- #28 Natural Beauty 10/20-10/26/14

The first of the weekend of October my fiance and I went to East Tennessee for a College Reunion/Vacation. These are a few picture I took while we were out exploring in the Great Smokey Mountains National Park.The park has a number of historical attractions. The most well-preserved of these (and most popular) is Cades Cove, a valley with a number of preserved historic buildings including log cabins, barns, and churches. Cades Cove is the single most frequented destination in the national park. Self-guided automobile and bicycle tours offer the many sightseers a glimpse into the way of life of old-time southernAppalachia. Other historical areas within the park include Roaring Fork, Cataloochee, Elkmont, and the Mountain Farm Museum and Mingus Mill at Oconaluftee. These are just a few of the pictures taken along the Cades Cove Loop

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Which way should we go?

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Great Smokey Mountains

Great Smokey Mountains

By xrayfrog

Week 7 #1 At a Distance 10/13-10/19/14

So in August Laurie and I decided we were going to go try something new. We booked a hotel room in Sun City just north of Temecula so we didn’t have to be up at 2 in the morning to make it to Miramonte Winery where our Sunrise Hot Air Balloon was scheduled to take off a little after 5:30am.The following are just a few of the pictures I took that morning. Definitely an experience worth having, even if like myself, you are afraid of heights. I found once we were in the air, that as long as I focused on the surrounding sites and did not look straight down, that I was ok. However looking straight down is what I had to do to get this picture. Needless to say, my nerves and stomach were a tad on edge, but it got better the longer we were up._DSC0039We were the 1st balloon into the air, this is looking back down at the other two preparing to take off.

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_DSC0044 second of three balloons that went up with us_DSC0045A little history on Temecula–“The first known white man to set foot in this area was a Franciscan padre, Father Juan Norberto de Santiago, who trudged into the valley in October of 1797. Santiago was on an expedition out of Mission San Juan Capistrano seeking a site for a new mission. With his exploring party of seven soldiers, he trekked to the shore of what is now Lake Elsinore, then traveled southward through the Temecula Valley and on to the ocean. During his years in California, Juan Santiago logged much information regarding the Temecula Valley area. He established a rancho at Mission San Luis Rey, and in 1810 returned to Mexico.
Little is known about Temecula during the early 1800’s because so many records were destroyed in the fire that followed the great San Francisco earthquake in 1906.

In 1821, Jose Sanchez, a Franciscan priest, recorded that he had accompanied Mariano Payeras, prefect of the missions, on a visit to Temecula. It was during this period that the Pala Mission was built and Christianization of the native Indians was begun.
Thirty-four years after Juan Santiago had visited the village of Temecula, an adventurous party of American trappers rode into the valley. The year was 1831. Among the group were Ewing Young, Isaac Galbraith, and John Turner.

By the mid-1840’s it became apparent that Mexico’s hold on California could no longer be retained and governors of the province began the process of making land grants to individuals. In 1845 Rancho Temecula was granted to Felix Valdez.
The passing of the ranchos into private ownership brought the romantic era of rancheros and vaqueros, for which early California is best known, into full bloom. It was a short-lived era, but perhaps nowhere in California did its aura linger longer than in the Temecula Valley.

One of the most often told stories of Temecula’s early days is of the Massacre in a nearby canyon that took place in January, 1847. The canyon is just below the present site of the Vail Lake Dam and was the scene of the bloodiest battle of the Mexican War. Excited by the fighting taking place around them, the Temecula Indians decided to do a little warring on their own. They captured 11 Mexican soldiers whom they later executed at a place now known as Warner Springs. A Mexican contingency was soon dispatched to run them down and avenge the deaths.
The Temeculans, who were now on the run, went into the canyon hoping to ambush their pursuers. The tables were turned on them, by the Mexicans who enlisted the aid of the nearby Cahuilla Indians, who had been itching to settle the score with the Temeculans over some previous skirmishes between the two tribes.
The Mexicans, feigning weariness and illness, lured the Temeculans out of the canyon and into the hands of the Cahuillas who promptly slaughtered them. Several days later the dead Temeculans were buried in a common grave, the mound of which is still visible from Highway 79.”

Sunrise flight

Sunrise flight

_DSC0052 looking over the side of our basket at the straggler balloon that took a little while to get off the ground

l_DSC0058the sun rising behind one of our fellow balloons  _DSC0067looking at a fellow balloon with the city of Temecula in the distance

_DSC0068 looking out over the wineries

_DSC0070Looking out over Lakes Skinner, Created in 1973, it has 1400 surface acres of water and is operated by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Supplied by the Colorado River through the Colorado River Aqueduct and the State Water Project, the lake feeds the Robert A. Skinner filtration plant and, in turn, supplies water to many residents of Southern California. While the park is popular for all its recreational activities, fishing is undoubtedly one of its biggest attractions.Lake Skinner is host each May to the nation’s largest solar boat program, the annual MWD sponsored Solar Cup.

_DSC0072 Fog still hanging out in the mountains

_DSC0089 third of three balloons that went up with us that morning_DSC0090Private family’s personal winery

By xrayfrog